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U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur Qualifier

The USGA Women’s Mid-Amateur Qualifier has concluded and left us with four qualifiers to send to the championship at Forest Highlands Golf Club, in Flagstaff, AZ on September 14-19, 2019. Kim Eaton, who is no stranger to USGA championships, earned the qualifying medalist title with a score of 73. Mari Meizwa and Thuhashina Selvaratnam tied for second place and will be competing in the championship alongside fourth-place qualifier Katerina Prorokova.

It was a heart-racing start for medalist, Kim Eaton, as she made 3 birdies in her first five holes. Eaton found herself three-over-par after 12 holes, but fortunately took the wheel again finding two more birdies in her remaining six holes. After the sweltering-hot round, Eaton explained, “It seems like I like this golf course. I play it well, even though I haven’t played a course this long in some time now.”

This will be the seventh U.S. Mid-Amateur that Eaton has competed in after taking a seven-year break from the qualifying due to medical reasons. “This is the first Mid-Am I have attempted to play in since 2012; that was my last one.” Eaton explained, “I couldn’t walk. I just got the medical exemption two years ago.”

Mari Meizwa and Thuhashina Selvaratnam  bagged the second and third qualifying spot after carding an 6-over 78. With a 7-over 79,  Katerina Prorokova snagged the final qualifying spot.

To compete in the U.S. Women’s Mid-Am means a great deal, specifically because Arizona is the host state of the championship. The tournament location is just a hop, skip, and jump north in beautiful Flagstaff Arizona, at Forest Highlands Golf Club. The championship site last hosted a USGA event in 2014 for the U.S. Girl’s Junior Amateur. The U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur originated in 1987, allowing women who were 25+ years of age and with a handicap of 9.4 or better to play.

 

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2019 Rules of Golf Toolkit

Rules Toolkit for Clubs & Facilities: To support the education of golfers at the club level, we are providing you with a link to a “digital” club/facility toolkit, which can be found here. Different from the Rules Education Toolkit that we shared with you this fall, this set of resources is focused on the golfer (not Rules official) and is designed to be used by club/facility employees to help educate and promote the major changes to the Rules of Golf.  The “physical” toolkit will contain copies of the three Rules publications along with a set of printed posters and “cart stickers,” which will also be made available for purchase on usgapublications.com in early 2019.

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New Global Ranking For Golfers With Disabilities To Launch In 2019

New Global Ranking For Golfers With Disabilities To Launch In 2019

LIBERTY CORNER, N.J. AND ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (Nov. 13, 2018) – The USGA and The R&A will administer a global ranking for golfers with disabilities, which will help to grow participation and competition around the world and to promote inclusivity within the sport.   The World Ranking for Golfers with Disability will launch on Jan. 1, 2019 and will be administered in tandem with the World Amateur Golf Ranking™ (WAGR™) for both men and women via www.WAGR.com.  The USGA and The R&A will assume responsibility for the ranking following agreement with EDGA, which created the comprehensive and independent Ranking for Golfers with Disability in 2014. Further information for golfers and tournament organizers wishing to register their details with the World Ranking for Golfers with Disability will be made available later this year.   “One of golf’s best benefits is that it can be played by everyone, and it can be played for a lifetime,” said John Bodenhamer, USGA Senior Managing Director of Championships.   “We are pleased to administer this ranking in partnership with The R&A, as it elevates an important population of the golf community that clearly loves the game and enables a variety of competitive opportunities around the world. Together with the modifications to the Rules of Golf for golfers with disabilities and the USGA’s work to make golf courses more accessible, we are working to create meaningful and lasting change to make golf more welcoming.”  Duncan Weir, Executive Director – Golf Development and Amateur Events at The R&A, said, “There is an accelerating growth in the number of events around the world for golfers with disabilities to compete in so it makes absolute sense that there is a global ranking to provide a robust measurement of an individual’s skill and ability.  “It is another important step towards ensuring that golf is more inclusive of people of all ages and abilities. Along with our colleagues at the USGA we will continue to support EDGA’s drive to grow participation and competition in the sport among all disability groups.” Tony Bennett, President of EDGA and Director of Education for the PGAs of Europe, said, “This is a crucial step forward for the growth and development of the sport for golfers with disabilities and we believe it will act as a catalyst for encouraging more people into playing golf, both competitively and recreationally, around the world.” The announcement of the World Ranking for Golfers with Disability coincides with the playing of the Australian All Abilities Championship, which is being organized by Golf Australia and will see 12 golfers compete at The Lakes in Sydney this week alongside the professionals at the Emirates Australian Open.  About the USGA The USGA conducts the U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open, U.S. Senior Open and the U.S. Senior Women’s Open, as well as 10 amateur championships and international matches, attracting players and fans around the world. Together with The R&A, the USGA governs the game worldwide, jointly administering the Rules of Golf, Rules of Amateur Status, and equipment standards, with a working jurisdiction in the United States, its territories, and Mexico.  The USGA and R&A also partner to administer the World Amateur Golf Ranking™ for men and women as a global service to the game.

The USGA is one of the world’s foremost authorities on research, development and support of sustainable golf course management practices. It serves as a primary steward for the game’s history and invests in the development of the game through the delivery of its services and the work of the USGA Foundation. Additionally, the USGA’s Course Rating and Handicap systems are used on six continents. For more information, visit www.usga.org.

About The R&A Based in St Andrews, The R&A runs The Open, elite amateur events, international matches and rankings. Together The R&A and the USGA govern the sport of golf worldwide, operating in separate jurisdictions but sharing a commitment to a single code for the Rules of Golf, Rules of Amateur Status and Equipment Standards. The R&A, through R&A Rules Ltd, governs the sport worldwide, outside of the United States and Mexico, on behalf of over 36 million golfers in 143 countries and with the consent of 156 organizations from amateur and professional golf.

The R&A is committed to working for golf and supports the growth of the sport internationally and the development and management of sustainable golf facilities.  For more information, visit www.randa.org.

 

Media Contacts

Janeen Driscoll USGA Communications +1 910.690.9711 [email protected]
mediacenter.usga.org

Stuart Moffatt The R&A Communications +44 (0) 7464 547 682 [email protected]
www.randa.org

 

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USGA and The R&A Finalize Limits on Use of Green-Reading Materials

Limits on size and scale of putting-green maps introduced but handwritten player and caddie notes still permitted

LIBERTY CORNER, N.J. AND ST ANDREWS, SCOTLAND  (October 15, 2018) – The USGA and The R&A have published the finalized interpretation on the use of green-reading materials in golf, which take effect on Jan. 1, 2019.The new interpretation of Rule 4.3 (Use of Equipment) has been introduced following a six-week feedback period. It reaffirms the governing bodies’ view that the ability of golfers to read greens using their own judgment is an essential skill that should be maintained, and defines how such materials may be used. The interpretation limits the size and scale of detailed putting-green maps and any similar electronic or digital materials that a player may use during a round to assist with reading his or her line of play on the putting green. “These latest modifications provide very practical changes that make the interpretation easier to understand and apply in the field,” said Thomas Pagel, USGA senior managing director, Governance. “We’re thankful for everyone’s willingness to provide feedback as we worked through the process of identifying a clear interpretation that protects the essential skill of reading a green, while still allowing for information that helps golfers enjoy the game.”
David Rickman, executive director – Governance at The R&A said, “We received some extremely useful feedback over the last six weeks that helped us finalize the limits. It is important that we take steps to ensure that skill and judgment are the main determinants of success in reading the greens. The new interpretation is a first step in the process and we will keep green-reading materials under review in 2019 to assess whether any further action is required.” Golfers may continue to use a putting-green map or other putting-green information, except that:

Any image of a putting green must be limited to a scale of 3/8 inch to 5 yards (1:480) or smaller (the “scale limit”).
Any book or other paper containing a map or image of a putting green must not be larger than 4 ¼ inches x 7 inches (the “size limit”), although a “hole location sheet” that displays nine or more holes on a single sheet of paper may be larger, provided that any image of a single putting green meets the scale limit.
No magnification of putting-green information is allowed other than a player’s normal wearing of prescription glasses or lenses.
Hand-drawn or written information about a putting green is only allowed if contained in a book or paper meeting the size limit and written by the player and/or his or her caddie.

The final interpretation also clearly defines that any use of electronic or digital putting-green maps must comply with the same limits.  A player is still in breach of Rule 4.3 if the player uses any device not consistent with the purpose of the limits, including:

Increasing the size of the green’s representation beyond the scale or size limits.
Producing a recommended line of play based on the location (or estimated location) of the player’s ball (see Rule 4.3a(1)).

Some of the changes made to the original proposal following the feedback period include the removal of: (1) the proposed minimum slope indication limit of 4% and (2) the prohibition against using handwritten notes to create a copy or facsimile of a detailed green map.Additions to the original proposal include: (1) a new size limit for the printed book/material (restricted to pocket-size), (2) a new prohibition against magnification of putting green information and (3) a new requirement that that any hand-drawn or written information must be in a book or on a paper meeting the size limit and must be written by the player and/or his or her caddie.The USGA and The R&A will continue to evaluate the future development and use of green-reading materials, as they ascertain the impact of the new interpretation to see if further modifications are necessary.
For more information about the new Rules of Golf please visit www.USGA.org or www.RandA.org.

About the USGAThe USGA conducts the U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open, U.S. Senior Open and the U.S. Senior Women’s Open, as well as 10 amateur championships and international matches, attracting players and fans around the world. Together with The R&A, the USGA governs the game worldwide, jointly administering the Rules of Golf, Rules of Amateur Status, equipment standards and World Amateur Golf Rankings, with a working jurisdiction in the United States, its territories and Mexico.

The USGA is one of the world’s foremost authorities on research, development and support of sustainable golf course management practices. It serves as a primary steward for the game’s history and invests in the development of the game through the delivery of its services and the work of the USGA Foundation. Additionally, the USGA’s Course Rating and Handicap systems are used on six continents. For more information, visit www.usga.org.

About The R&ABased in St Andrews, The R&A runs The Open, elite amateur events, international matches and rankings. Together The R&A and the USGA govern the sport of golf worldwide, operating in separate jurisdictions but sharing a commitment to a single code for the Rules of Golf, Rules of Amateur Status and Equipment Standards. The R&A, through R&A Rules Ltd, governs the sport worldwide, outside of the United States and Mexico, on behalf of over 36 million golfers in 143 countries and with the consent of 156 organizations from amateur and professional golf.

The R&A is committed to working for golf and supports the growth of the sport internationally and the development and management of sustainable golf facilities.  For more information, visit www.randa.org.