News

U.S. Open Local Qualifying in Arizona

The road to Pebble Beach for the 2019 U.S. Open Championship has begun after the USGA accepted 8,602 entries, comprised of professional and amateur golfers. With 110 local qualifying sites and 500 spots available for sectional qualifying, the Arizona Golf Association conducted four local qualifier with 19 spots up for grabs.

Sewailo Local Qualifier

The first to punch his ticket to golf’s ultimate test in Arizona was Stephen Allan. A six-under earned the Australian native medalist honors. University of Arizona junior, Brigg Duce carded a back nine 32 and finished his round at five-under (66). Also posting a 66, Drew Kittleson was the second amateur in the field to advance to sectional qualifying. Denzel Ieremia became one step closer to the U.S. Open after winning a playoff against University of Arizona Sophomore, Trevor Werbylo.

Full Results: Click Here

The Country Club at DC Ranch U.S. Open Local Qualifier

Each carding a three-under 67, Billy Comeaux, Leon D’Souza, Bradley Harrelson and Daniel Sun topped the leader board securing their spots to sectional qualifying. Darren Fletcher registered two birdies on his last three holes to force a playoff and take the fifth qualifying spot.

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Ak-Chin Southern Dunes Local Qualifier

Blake WagonerBenjamin Shur, Kent Eger and  Jared du Toit all tied for medalist honors after posting a four-under 67 at Ak Chin Southern Dunes Local Qualifying. Arizona State junior, Blake Wagoner, was the only amateur in the field to qualify. Jeremy Paul locked in his qualifying spot after signing for a three-under 68.

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Phoenix Country Club Local Qualifier

Tyler Kertson, Matthew McClung and Richard Lee earned medalist honors with a four-under 67 at Phoenix Country Club. Tucker Wadkins and Shane Bacon clinched the last two qualifying spots finishing one stroke behind the medalists with a 68.

Full Results: Click Here

News

Cory Bacon Prevails to Win Arizona Stroke Play Championship

Cory Bacon’s final round 66 lead him to a comfortable 10-shot victory at the 2019 Arizona Stroke Play Championship. Nearly going wire-to-wire after carding the championship’s two lowest rounds (65 & 66) during the second and third round, Bacon headed into the final 18 on Sunday with a four-shot lead over GCU junior Trevor Lampson.

Signing for a bogey-free 6-under 66, Bacon cruised to his victory to bring the kachina trophy home. The PING Senior Engineer posted a clutch front nine 32 followed by a back nine 34 to take a commanding win. Bacon finished the weekend with a 269 (72-65-66-66).

“The two rounds (rounds 2 & 3) at the Victory Course were amazing. I putted really well on those greens. Out here today, my goal was to protect my four-shot lead and make a lot of pars. I didn’t miss any short putts and that was the key,” the champion said.

With rounds of 71-68-68-72, GCU Lope Trevor Lampson finished his four-day, 72-hole week 10 shots shy of Bacon. GCU sophomore Max Sekulic wound up at 6-under for the tournament, finishing third and thirteen shots behind the champion.

After defeating the 2015 AGA Player of the Year and current PGA TOUR Champions player Ken Tanigawa at the 2016 Arizona Amateur Championship, Bacon picked up his first AGA title. This win was of paramount importance to the 29-year-old.

“My win from three years ago and this one are my top two wins. It’s definitely sweet. This is my first stroke play win.”

With a tournament field size of 75, the 2019 Arizona Stroke Play Championships, hosted by Verrado Golf Club, marks Arizona’s second major of the year. The next Arizona Golf Association Championship is the Arizona Mid- Amateur scheduled June 07 – 09 2019 at Talking Stick Golf Club.

Full Results: Click Here

News

Golf Industry Comes Together for 12th Annual National Golf Day

Golf Industry Comes Together for 12th Annual National Golf Day, Bringing Stories of Positive Economic and Community Impact to Washington D.C.

Record-High 244 Meetings with Members of Congress from 41 States
Showcase the Game’s Value & Importance Across U.S.

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) – Golf industry leaders participated in a record-high 244 meetings with members of Congress representing 41 states to discuss the game’s economic, social and environmental contributions to the United States during today’s 12th annual National Golf Day on Capitol Hill.

Coordinated by a coalition of the game’s leading associations and industry partners under the banner of WE ARE GOLF, National Golf Day brings together more than 300 industry leaders from across the U.S. to support the game’s $84.1 billion economy, nearly $4 billion annual charitable impact, close to 15,000 diverse businesses and two million jobs impacted.

“The game of golf is growing and evolving, and it is important that we come together collectively in Washington to share stories of impact the game is having on business and communities across the United States,” said Greg McLaughlin, CEO of World Golf Foundation, the organization that coordinates WE ARE GOLF activities. “From athletes from every corner of the world competing each week on the PGA TOUR and LPGA, to global companies investing billions of dollars in and around the sport, to healthy participation in traditional and emerging ways, the game of golf is a strong and vibrant part of American culture.”

“We are here to educate our elected officials that the golf industry is made up of many small businesses that contribute to our national economy,” said Jay Karen, CEO of National Golf Course Owners Association and Chair of the WE ARE GOLF Board. “The importance of fair and good taxation policies is paramount to the success of our businesses.”
“Sports have always been an important part of American culture, and in my hometown of Augusta, Georgia, golf is at the heart of our town’s traditions and identity,” said Rep. Rick Allen (R-GA). “On National Golf Day, we renew our commitment to ensure Americans not only play the game for decades to come, but also ensure golf’s economic, social and charitable impacts are effectively communicated and protected.”

“So many golf courses in the US, including courses in my district, are public facilities operating as small, locally owned businesses,” said Rep. Bill Keating (D-MA). “National Golf Day highlights the industry’s importance to American society, including business, recreation, hospitality and tourism. Anything that brings people together is great, and golf brings people together.”

On Tuesday, April 30, the third-annual Community Service Project featured over 200 participants demonstrating the industry’s commitment to collaboration on beautifying and preserving historical landmarks between the Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument. Golf industry leaders, coordinated by Golf Course Superintendents Association of America, volunteered to lay sod, rake, edge, overseed, aerate, mow, mulch, brush walkways and spruce gravel pathways across 17 projects along the National Mall.  The four hours of work saved the U.S. National Park Service nearly four months of labor costs.

Numerous golf courses and industry businesses celebrated and recognized National Golf Day in their own communities through activities and special offers. Included was Topgolf, which offered complimentary group golf instruction lessons at 50 locations across the U.S.

To join the social media conversation, use #NationalGolfDay and tag @wearegolf on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to support the industry as well as share why golf is more than a game to you.

For more information on National Golf Day, click here.

About World Golf Foundation

The mission of the World Golf Foundation is to unite the golf industry in support of initiatives that enhance the growth of and provide access to the game of golf worldwide, while preserving golf’s traditional values and passing them on to others. Its board is comprised of European Tour, LPGA, The Masters, PGA of America, PGA TOUR, R&A and USGA. World Golf Foundation oversees the collaborative industry initiative, We Are Golf, as well as World Golf Hall of Fame.

For more information, please visit www.wearegolf.org.